MILITARY

Since 1952, Greece has been member of the NATO alliance and the Greek armed forces have been organized and operated within the framework of the alliance. The Greek military had a long history of involvement in politics. Following the Second World War and the ensuing civil war, the military's political role was quite evident as the armed forces became the primary supporter of the throne and of conservative rule. In April 1967, military officers staged a coup d'etat and overthrew the democratic system of government. Military rule ended in July 1974 following the Greek junta's coup against Cypriot President Archbishop Makarios and the Turkish invasion of Cyprus which followed the coup. A totally discredited military junta collapsed on July 23, three days after the Turkish invasion, It was replaced by civilian rule under Constantine Karamanlis. Since 1974, there have been several steps of army reform, and today the armed forces appear dedicated to their duty in defending the country from external military threats and are disinclined to get involved in politics.

Defense  Expenditures:

Defense expenditure:    1992:   dr 623.1 bn ($3.3 bn)
                        1993:   dr 692.4 bn ($3.3 bn)

Defense budget: 1993:   dr 615.6 bn ($3.3 bn)
                        1994:   dr 753.4 bn ($3.3 bn)
NATO defense:   1992:   dr 809.4 bn ($4.2 bn)
                        1993:   dr 934.0 bn ($4.1 bn)


Total  Armed  Forces:

Active: 159,300 (122,300 conscripts, 5,900 women)
Terms of service: Army up to 19 months, Navy up to 23 months, Air Force up to 21
        months
Reserves: some 406,000 (to age 50), Army some 350,000 (Field Army 230,000,
        Territorial Army/National Guard 120,000); Navy about 24,000; Air Force
        about 32,000.

Army:  113,000 (100,000 conscripts, 2,200 women).
        Field Army:  (82,000); 3 Military Regions.
        Territorial Defense:  31,000
        Reserves (National Guard): 34,000; role: internal security.
        Equipment:      Main Battle Tanks: 2,722.
                Light Tanks: 67.
                Total Artillery: 2,019.
Aircraft:  2 Aero Commander, 2 Super King Air, 20 U-17A.
Helicopters:  Total 160.

Navy:  19,500 (7,900 conscripts, 2,600 women).
        Bases:  Salamis, Patras, Soudha Bay.
        Submarines: 8
        Principal Surface Combatants:  14.
                Destroyers: 6.
                Frigates:     8.
        Patrol and Coastal Combatants:  42.
                Corvettes: 5.
                Missile Craft: 18.
                Torpedo Craft: 10.
        Patrol: 9.
                Coastal: 4.
                Inshore: 5.         
        Mine Warfare: 16.
                Minelayers: 2.
                Mine Countermeasures: 14.
        Amphibious:  10.
        Support and Miscellaneous: 14.
        Naval Air:  12 armed helicopters.
        Anti-Submarine Warfare: 1 helicopter division.

Air Force:  26,800 (14,400 conscripts, 1,100 women).
        Tactical Air Force:  8 combat wings, 1 transportation wing.
        FGA (fighter, ground-attack): 6 squadrons.
        Fighter: 10 sqn.
        Aircraft:       A-7: 38;        F-5: 90;         F-4: 74 ;      F-16: 35.
                        Mirage F-1: 26;         Mirage 2000: 36.

Forces Abroad:  
        Cyprus:  2,250; 2 infantry battalions and officers/NCO seconded to
        Greek-Cypriot forces.
        UN and Peacekeeping:  Adriatic (Sharp Guard): 1 frigate.
                                Iraq/Kuwait (UNIKOM): 7 Observers.
                                Western Sahara: (MINURSO): 1 Observer.

Paramilitary
        Gendarmerie: 26,500
        Coast Guard and Customs: 4,000; some 100 patrol craft.



Foreign Forces
        US: 760: Army (60); Navy (200); facilities at Soudha Bay; Air Force (500),
        2 air base gp.

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